Tag Archives: Next Generation National Science Education Standards

Welcome to “Simple Science Strategies!”

Follow Me on Pinterest

Maybe you landed here through a Google search. Maybe you’re looking over your science materials for next year, and getting a jump on planning for September. Maybe you linked here through one of my other blogs. Whichever it might be, I welcome you!

Science is my passion. I love everything about it, and I find science in everything I do, as a mom, a gardener, a teacher and a homeschooler. I hope you find this blog to be a helpful tool as you plan to work more science, and better quality science activities, into your repertoire.

The purpose of this site is to help you, the teacher or homeschooler, find simple experiments and investigations that you can conduct that teach big scientific ideas. You will notice that none of the activities use hard-to-find materials or complicated procedures. You will also notice that ALL of them require kids to ask questions and do some big thinking. Science is about asking questions, then figuring out a way to answer them on your own.

These activities and experiments can be used with any age student — you will notice, at the bottom of each post, suggestions modifications to the basic experimental design, for different age groups of students. Most of the modification involve different types of questioning or follow-up, rather than major changes to the actual activity.

You have a couple of ways to navigate this site.

  1. The main navigation bar, at the top, guides you to strategies and activities, organized by the three dimensions of the Next Generation National Science Education Standards: scientific and engineering process skills; cross-cutting, multidisciplinary concepts; and key ideas in physical sciences, life sciences, earth and space sciences, and engineering, technology and science applications. ]
  2. To the right, you may access the site by browsing according to the cognitive process that you want to reinforce with students: defining, describing, comparing, classifying, showing part-to-whole, showing cause-effect, and illustrating an analogy (see Hyerle’s Thinking Maps for more information on these processes).
  3. Of course, you can always browse the site using the “Recent Posts” links in the sidebar, the search function, or just the front and back navigation arrows at the top of each blog post.
  4. If you are looking for Common Core connections, type the notation for the CCSS into the search box, and see a list of activities linked to key literacy and numeracy standards.

Please visit often over the summer, as I will be adding to this blog using topics that are seasonal, to help teachers connect their science instruction to real-life situations. For updates directly to your email box, subscribe to our newsletter (the September edition should be posted on August 24, 2012).

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to our Newsletter:Delivered by FeedBurner

 

Leave me a note if you have any suggestions or topics that you’d like to see covered. Or just to leave a word of encouragement!

– Kim at Simple Science Strategies

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Pin It