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Check Out These November Carnival Entries!

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Welcome to the December 2, 2012 Edition of

The Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival!

 

Potpourri…

Liz E presents “Worm Farming Adventures,” posted at Homeschooling in Buffalo, a beautiful photo gallery of her family’s worm bin project. This is a great “Potpourri” addition to the carnival! If you’ve never had a worm bin in your homeschool or classroom, try one this winter — it’s a great way to bring nature inside when it’s too cold to play outside.

Autumn Nature Finds…

From our house, we present “Ten (10) Fall Nature Studies: What the Leaves Have Kept Hidden”, posted at A Child’s Garden. We also submitted this to the “Top 10 Tuesday” Blog Carnival – a list of all the interesting things we have found on our travels this month.

Fall Nature Study - Evidence

Fallen leaves reveal a world of autumn treasures to study. (c) Kim M. Bennett.

   Thanks for your submissions! Remember, each submission earns the entrant a free e-Book of science journaling pages.

The Winter Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival Begins!

December is a short month for many of us, because of parent conferences, winter holidays, and family vacations. For this reason, the next Blog Carnival will be a December/January edition, or a Winter Edition. Here are the details for the upcoming edition:

Topics for the edition

  • Patterns in Nature
  • Snow
  • Vines
  • The Winter Sky

 

Scientific and Engineering Practices

  • Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking

 

 

Cross-Cutting Concept

  • Patterns

 

 

Disciplinary Core Ideas

  • Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science: Engineering Design

 

 

Strategies:

  • The Experience (Documentation) Panel
  • Illustrating Analogies: The Bridge Map

 

 

Submit your blog article to the next edition of Simple Science Strategies using the logo link below (by January 31, for February 2 posting), or our sidebar carnival submission form. Be on the lookout for the print copy of the December/January Simple Science Strategies Newsletter, and the next e-Book edition, on evergreens. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

**** UPDATE!****

Here is the link for the post with the downloadable newsletter:

The Winter 2012/2013 Simple Science Strategy Newsletter


Blog Carnival submission form - simple science strategies

 


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Without further ado, here is the … November 2012 Edition… of the Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival. Preparing for Winter This months focus will be on how living things prepare for winter. Four different topics will be covered, as is … Continue reading

Here’s the October Edition of the Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival!

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Welcome to the October 31, 2012 edition of the Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival!

I delayed publishing for a few days, as I know many of my readers have been struggling with weather-related issues, in the wake of Hurricane Sandy and the Superstorm that followed. I pray that all are safe and sound and back to full power soon, if not today.

Thank you for participating in the October Edition of the Simple Science Strategies Blog Carnival!

 

Changing Seasons

Kim Bennett presents Signs of Autumn: Our Trip to the Orchard posted at A Child’s Garden, saying, “We took the opportunity to enjoy a beautiful autumn day and pick some tasty apples, in the process! We could have filed this under “Fruits and Seeds,” too.”

 

Fruits and Seeds

The Bennett family then follows up with Two Easy Apple Experiments posted on Squidoo, saying, “This lens was an extension of our apple orchard field trip (see “A Child’s Garden”), and was fun to do for some “kitchen counter science.””

 

Potpourri

freelee presents “Be a Backyard Scientist” posted at 52 Days to Explore, saying, “Botany, biology and other sciences in the back yard with simple items you may have.”

That concludes this edition. Thank you to all participants! Each submission earns a free copy of “Autumn Leaves: A Plant Study,” a 23-page science journaling e-Book for studying fall leaves.

Submit your blog article to the November edition of Simple Science Strategies using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.


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Cause and Effect: Using a Multi-Flow Map in a Science Center

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Why Study Cause and Effect?

Scientific investigation and experimentation is all about connecting things. In  order for students to connect two events, or a treatment and its effects, students have to understand that things stay the same, unless acted upon by something else, and that things have the ability to change the behavior of other things.

science strategies cause and effect flow map

Understanding cause and effect is central to scientific thinking and exploration. Photo Credit: Alastros Oistros, 2005, via Creative Commons

Understanding cause and effect is a complex skill, involving many subskills:

  • Direct observation of objects and their attributes
  • Observation of objects through the use of simple tests and tools
  • Connection of two events
  • Making predictions based on facts, observations and past experiences
  • Evaluation of the probability and possibility of past and future events, based on observations, the body of scientific knowledge and past experiences
  • Understanding and communication of scientific ideas in words, diagrams and writing
  • Understanding causality and correlation

In short, the understanding of cause and effect, and communication about it, is at the heart of scientific experimentation and investigation.

Tools for Communication Cause and Effect

David Hyerle has established a system of eight Thinking Maps to organize thinking around distinct cognitive processes. One of these maps, the Multi-Flow Map, is specifically created, by the learner, to demonstrate cause-and-effect relationships. (Please click on the link, below, for resources prepared by Wappinger Central School District, in Fishkill, New York, for teaching about the Multi-Flow Map and using it with students:

The Multi-Flow Map

The Multi-Flow Map: useful for demonstrating an understanding of cause and effect relationships.

Using a Multi-Flow Map in the Classroom

This month, we have been using some typical October events to teach questioning:

  • the formation of fruits and seeds from flowers
  • fall color development
  • bird migration
  • changes in the weather

Here are some ways that you could use a multi-flow map in a science center, to provide independent practice in showing cause and effect. Provide the object identified, blank observations sheets and the directions for making a multi-flow map (see the link, above). Leave “cue cards” with the words “What happened here?” and “What will happen next?” Provide a basket for completed work, or create a class bulletin board for students to combine all their thinking into a classroom display (use different colored cards for causes, the event, and effects, and connect with string — leave a stapler at the bulletin board to facilitate student independence).

Fruit and Seed formation

  • an apple with a poke in the side
  • a cut or bitten apple that has begun to discolor
  • an apple with a bruise or rotten spot
  • a photograph of a chipmunk with full cheek pouches
  • a photograph of a blue jay with an acorn in its beak

Fall color formation

  • a branchlet with leaves in different stages of color development
  • a skeletonized leaf
  • a leaf with scorched leaf margins
  • a leaf with sooty mold, powdery mildew, or leaf spot
  • a leaf with insect galls

Bird migration

  • a photograph of geese in V-formation
  • a photograph of blackbirds congregating near a feeder
  • a photograph of vultures climbing a thermal
  • a photograph of goldfinches or other bird in transition plumage

Weather changes

  • a photograph of flooding after Hurricane Sandy
  • a photograph of a tree on downed power lines
  • a photograph of houses collapsed on a beach after a hurricane
  • a photograph of a person chopping wood
  • a photograph of wood smoke coming from a chimney
  • a photograph of  a pile of student jackets on the playground

A Note About Centers

Whenever possible, use real objects, and any relevant tools, instead of photographs or pictures. When photographs or pictures are used, make them relevant to the students. For example, after our experiences with Hurricane Sandy,  I would photograph downed trees or flooding in my town, or the school’s flooded playground, instead of another location. Always use whatever has the most meaning to your students.

science strategies cause and effect flow map

Use available, familiar items whenever designing independent learning centers. Photo credit: (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2011

 

 

 

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The October Simple Science Strategies Newsletter is Ready!

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Download the October Newsletter today!

As promised, here is the next edition of the Simple Science Strategies Newsletter for 2012.

In this edition, we explore Stability and Change through nature studies of fruit and seed development, migration, fall color change and the arrival of autumn weather. In the process, we will learn more about the role of questioning in scientific thinking, and learn ways to help students explore cause and effect. Right click on the text or photo link, below, and save on your computer wherever you choose. Print out or view online (note: the document contains hyperlinks to important resources).

October 2012 Edition of

The Simple Science Strategies Newsletter

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We have been busy working on nature study projects involving wildflowers, seeds and other fall wonders. The August/September garden is just bursting with color! In a couple of short weeks, the red maples will begin to announce the shifting of … Continue reading

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