Tag Archives: squirrels

New e-Book: Nests, Nests, Nests!

Follow Me on Pinterest
Burgess Animal Book for Children

Nests, Nests, Nests! – a 25-page e-Book for zoology and nature study. Simple Science Strategies, $1.95

Earlier this month, we studied nests, comparing a squirrel’s nest to an oriole’s nest in “Comparing Nests: The ‘Same and Different’ Center.”   For those of you who want to study nests in more depth, I am pleased to share my newest e-Book, Nests, Nests, Nests!

Nests, Nests, Nests! is a 25-page e-Book perfect for the elementary classroom or homeschool science class.

This set includes both primary and regular-ruled science journaling pages focusing on animal nests, as well as a variety of framed pages for thematic writing, note-taking or nature study. Organizers for studying and comparing nests of different animal orders, coloring and copywork pages, and game cards for sorting and classification tasks make this set versatile, perfect for direct instruction or independent learning tasks.

Burgess Animal Book for Children

Set includes both primary- and regular-ruled pages.

Burgess Animal Book for Children

Several different organizers lead students to compare nests of different animal orders, and to develop a deeper understanding of the purpose of an animal nest.

 

Vintage botanical and zoological illustrations provide high-quality visuals for students to study and color, and the pages include plenty of space for journaling, notebooking or note-taking tasks.

Plain lined pages provide space for more extended writing tasks, or writing paper for independent writing tasks.

The nests of 6 different animal orders  are featured, to get students to think beyond birds’ nests in this study.

Three different organizers are provided: a double-bubble map, and a concept definition frame and a discussion frame.

The double-bubble can be used to compare two different nests, either from the illustrations, from text studies, or from a classroom collection of nests.

The concept definition frame can be used by the class to determine the essential qualities of any nest, and to develop an operational definition about what a nest really is.

The discussion frame is useful for cooperative learning tasks where students decide whether or not humans also create nests.

Burgess Animal Book for Children

Two pages of sortable animal nest cards can be used for a variety of games or independent learning tasks.

Burgess Animal Book for Children

Manuscript and cursive copywork pages include scriptures that fit the theme.

A two-page set of images can be used to create a sort activity, for small group or independent learning task use. Simply copy them onto cardstock or heavy paper.

Images includes nests from birds, mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, amphibians, and other animal orders.

All images are original or images that are in the public domain. All the remaining work is original work.

 

If you are a homeschooler, and are looking for a “one-stop” set of notebooking pages, you will appreciate the manuscript and cursive copywork, which draws upon Scriptures on theme.

Per customer requests, this zoology item also includes suggested lesson uses, linked resources and much more.

btn_buynow_SM

Click the button to order now!

 

The link to download the .pdf will be emailed to the email address you provide, within 24 hrs of your purchase.

Pin It

Comparing Nests: The “Same and Different” Center

Follow Me on Pinterest

Similarities and Differences

Research-based Strategies for Teaching and Learning

Over the past several years, researchers have studied thousands of teaching and learning strategies, to determine which ones yielded the best increases in student performance (Classroom Instruction That Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement presents one meta-analysis of these strategies).

The type of learning task that led to the greatest learning in students involved comparing two things to determine how they were alike and how they were different from one another. This shouldn’t surprise us, when we consider that all of us learn new things by comparing the new with the known, in order to better “file” the information in our brains.

This article explains a simple center that you can create to compare any two objects (related to your theme or content), in an interactive bulletin board display. We will use a squirrel’s nest and the nest of a Northern oriole, to accompany our November studies of autumn nature finds.

Materials

  • Index cards (three colors)
  • Markers
  • Colored yarn
  • A stapler
  • A large photograph of a squirrel’s nest
  • An oriole nest (or large photo)
  • Bulletin board space
  • Sentence strip (2 foot-long pieces)
  • Scissors
  • Field guides or other non-fiction resources on nests

Procedure:

[NOTE: This is designed to be an independent learning center. The assumption is made that students have already been introduced to, and know how to work with, both the bubble map and double bubble map, described in early posts.]

Provide materials on a counter below a bulletin board (cover the bulletin board with whatever covering you’d like — I used to buy fabric remnants on theme, and kept them folded in the box with the other unit materials, to use year after year).

Students use the photos or actual nests, and the non-fiction resources, to generate characteristics or descriptions of the two nests. In the diagram below, blue index cards are used for the characteristics of the squirrel’s nest, yellow cards for the oriole’s nest, and white cards for descriptors that can be used for both nests. Cards are stapled to the bulletin board, and attached to the appropriate header and/or photo with string (I opted for brightly colored yarn).

Leave the bulletin board up for interactive work for the duration of the unit.

science centers comparing nests

A simple, interactive bulletin board becomes a powerful tool for comparing two nests during independent learning time. Image credit: (c) Kim M. Bennett, 2012.

Assessment

Make the assessment part of the student work, inviting students to question one another and revise one another’s work. For example, I have used a small, simple “o” on interactive bulletin board work, to indicate an “opportunity” for other students to revise a piece of information. When the information is updated successfully, I simply cover the “o” with a small, round sticker.

Periodically use the collaborative display in response work, having students summarize the learning, to date. Refer to the work during whole class instruction, as well.

Classroom routines

Once students have used this center, you can use the routine to compare all sorts of things: two books on a theme or topic; two closely related vocabulary words (e.g., blissful, ecstatic); two geometric figures (e.g., rectangle, trapezoid); two biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration).

In my elementary classroom, interactive bulletin boards were a staple among my learning centers — they fostered conversation and collaboration, were hands-on, and created a healthy “buzz” of learning. The differentiation is built into the task, allowing multiple “entry points” for the content. And the routine of revisiting the work reinforces to students that the classroom displays are meant to be resources for the students to use daily.

Additional lesson ideas

Burgess Animal Book for Children

For more instructional activities to use in conjunction with this learning center, please see “New e-Book: Nests, Nests, Nests!”,  a 25-page e-Book perfect for the elementary classroom or homeschool science class ($1.95 from Simple Science Strategies).

This set includes both primary and regular-ruled science journaling pages focusing on animal nests, as well as a variety of framed pages for thematic writing, note-taking or nature study. Organizers for studying and comparing nests of different animal orders, coloring and copywork pages, and game cards for sorting and classification tasks make this set versatile, perfect for direct instruction or independent learning tasks. Also included with this e-Book is a summary of ten lesson ideas with linked resources, enough for a great integrated unit on animal nests.

Animal taxonomy studies

One of our favorite animal study books…

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Pin It